Tue. May 21st, 2024
taylor-alert-–-the-project-host-georgie-tunny-goes-into-complete-meltdown-over-taylor-swift’s-surprise-tortured-poets-department-double-album-drop:-‘i’m-unwell!’Taylor Alert – The Project host Georgie Tunny goes into complete meltdown over Taylor Swift’s surprise Tortured Poets Department double album drop: ‘I’m unwell!’

The Project host Georgie Tunny went into complete meltdown live on air over Taylor Swift’s double album drop on Friday.

The global megastar shocked fans when she revealed her 11th studio album, The Tortured Poets Department, was a surprise double edition, unveiling 31 new songs for delighted listeners.

Swifties were sent into a frenzy after the double release and were quick to share their theories on the meanings of the lyrics on Taylor’s most personal album yet.

And die-hard fan Georgie, 33, was quick to get involved with the mania as she sent her The Project co-hosts into hysterics as she struggled to contain herself on air.

During a Taylor-dedicated segment on the show, Rove MacManus revealed that they would be speaking to radio host and Swiftie Nic Kelly to evaluate the new release.

The Project host Georgie Tunny (pictured) went into complete meltdown live on air over Taylor Swift's double album drop on Friday

The Project host Georgie Tunny (pictured) went into complete meltdown live on air over Taylor Swift’s double album drop on Friday

The global megastar shocked fans when she revealed her 11th studio album, The Tortured Poets Department, was a surprise double edition, unveiling 31 new songs for listeners. Swift is pictured

The global megastar shocked fans when she revealed her 11th studio album, The Tortured Poets Department, was a surprise double edition, unveiling 31 new songs for listeners. Swift is pictured

But the comedian, 50, was left in hysterics as Georgie struggled to keep her cool on the panel beside him and went into a complete meltdown in true mega-fan style.

She looked wide-eyed with shock and held her hands to her face as she became overwhelmed with excitement, as Rove laughed and asked her if she was ‘alright’.

Sharing her very candid reaction to the exciting double release, Georgie gushed: ‘I’m very unwell, I am unwell! What in the hell? Two albums, two!’

As diehard Nic shared his excitement about the album and discussed the new tracks on video call, Susie Youssef asked Georgie if she was remembering to breathe amid her excitement.

‘We’re not breathing,’ Georgie declared of her and Nic’s reactions to the double release.

Die-hard fan Georgie, 33, was quick to get involved with the mania as she sent her The Project co-hosts into hysterics as she struggled to contain her excitement live on air

Die-hard fan Georgie, 33, was quick to get involved with the mania as she sent her The Project co-hosts into hysterics as she struggled to contain her excitement live on air 

Their co-hosts joked that Georgie and Nic were speaking a ‘different language’ as they discussed the songs, with the rest of the panel proving themselves not to be Swifties.

Georgie joined fans in theorising that new track thanK you aIMee is about her feud with Kim Kardashian, given the capital letters spell out the TV star’s name.

She also shared her annoyance that she had only been able to listen to a handful of songs from the 31-track-long epic as she complained about having to be at work on the big day. 

‘I’ve only been able to listen to like three songs,’ she fumed to her co-hosts.

Taylor sent social media into meltdown when she dropped the 16-track record at midnight ET (2am UK time), before announcing 15 bonus songs just two hours later.

Taylor sent social media into meltdown when she dropped the 16-track record at midnight ET (2am UK time), before announcing 15 bonus songs just two hours later

Taylor sent social media into meltdown when she dropped the 16-track record at midnight ET (2am UK time), before announcing 15 bonus songs just two hours later 

She was accused of trying to con her fans by dropping the 15 further surprise new tracks, after fans had already splashed out to buy multiple versions of the original record in a bid to get their hands on the initial all four bonus tracks. 

Of the surprise second half of the release, Taylor told her followers that she’d written ‘so much tortured poetry in the past two years’ that she wanted to share it with her fans.

Sharing the double album was called The Tortured Poets Department: The Anthology, she wrote on Instagram: ‘It’s a 2am surprise: The Tortured Poets Department is a secret DOUBLE album.

‘I’d written so much tortured poetry in the past 2 years and wanted to share it all with you, so here’s the second installment of TTPD: The Anthology. 15 extra songs. And now the story isn’t mine anymore… it’s all yours.’ 

While the deluxe version is not yet available for Taylor’s website, there were four different versions of the original album available, each containing a different bonus track, are priced at £13.99 ($17.38).

The vinyl version, including bonus track The Manuscript, costs £33.99 ($42.23), while a 'phantom clear vinyl' is price the same.

This means that if Swifties were willing to splash out on every incarnation of the album, it will already set them back over £140 ($174).

It remains to be seen how much more this new supersized version of the album, and its various vinyl counterparts, will cost.

Despite the prospect of hefty price tag, many of Taylor's fans, who were still dissecting the first 16 songs, went into meltdown that there were even more tracks for them to enjoy.

The Tortured Poets Department also struck to same chord with critics, with many reviews praising the 'gloriously chotic' and 'audacious' effort. 

Critics were quick to brand Taylor's album her 'most personal yet' and branded it a 'sharp savage attack on her British exes,' after fans speculated that several tracks took aim at her former flames Joe Alwyn and Matty Healy.

She was accused of trying to con her fans by dropping the 15 extra tracks, after fans had already splashed out to buy the original record - but Swifties still raved over the release

She was accused of trying to con her fans by dropping the 15 extra tracks, after fans had already splashed out to buy the original record - but Swifties still raved over the release

Writing in Variety, Chris Willman noted that the album is 'renewing Taylor's vows with heartbreak,' noting that it had been a decade since she had released a similar record taking such swipes at her exes.

Rolling Stone's Rob Sheffeld described the album as her 'most personal album yet,' adding: 'It's the cathartic confession of a woman who thought she had adulthood — and adult romance — all figured out, only to find herself realizing she knows nothing.

'Even by Swiftian standards, she gets wildly ambitious with her songwriting here.'

Referencing the album before Taylor unveiled 15 bonus tracks, The Daily Mail's Adrian Thrills penned: 'There's certainly a sense that she's pulling out all the stops on The Tortured Poets Department. 

'Even for someone with a track record of lengthy, value-for-money albums, it's a mammoth undertaking. 

In a slew of reviews, critics were quick to brand Taylor's album her 'most personal yet' and branded it a 'sharp savage attack on her British exes' (the singer is pictured with Joe Alwyn)

In a slew of reviews, critics were quick to brand Taylor's album her 'most personal yet' and branded it a 'sharp savage attack on her British exes' (the singer is pictured with Joe Alwyn)

The Tortured Poets Department: What do the critics think?

Variety - Chris Willman

'The Tortured Poets Department gives everyone a full dose of the never-getting-over-it Taylor that no one really wanted to get over. 

'As breakup albums go, it's a doozy, as they would have said back in Clara Bow's day - an unapologetically dramatic (if often witty) record that will be soundtracking untold millions of tragic rifts to come. If you've been putting one off, now might not be a bad time to schedule it.'

Rolling Stone - Rob Sheffeld

It's the cathartic confession of a woman who thought she had adulthood — and adult romance — all figured out, only to find herself realizing she knows nothing.

'Even by Swiftian standards, she gets wildly ambitious with her songwriting here.'

The Telegraph - Neil McCormick

Rating:

'On the simplest of terms, what we have here is a very smart, seductive, lyrically sharp set of smooth synth pop songs about affairs of the heart, crafted with love, intelligence and passion – another hugely appealing addition to Swift's expanding canon...'

The Guardian - Alexis Petridis

Rating:

'There's clearly a risk involved in calling out elements of your own fanbase, however justified said attack is, but Swift pulls it off.

'She can do it because she's an exceptionally talented writer: there's a depth and maturity to this album that makes her competitors look a little wan by comparison.'

NME - Laura Malloy

Rating:

'Swift seems to be in tireless pursuit for superstardom, yet the negative public opinion it can come with irks her, and it's a tired theme now plaguing her discography and leaving little room for the poignant lyrical observations she excels at.'

The Daily Mail - Adrian Thrills

Rating:

'There's certainly a sense that she's pulling out all the stops on The Tortured Poets Department. 

'Even for someone with a track record of lengthy, value-for-money albums, it's a mammoth undertaking.'

The Standard - El Hunt

Rating:

'There are no doubt countless lyrical puzzles here, waiting to be unpicked, but The Tortured Poets Department is at its most potent when it does away with all of the arch devices and spells it out plainly.' 

The Times - Will Hodgkinson

Rating:

'Taking in synth pop, Eighties power ballads and the emotional AOR of Stevie Nicks (who offers her own poem on love gone wrong in the liner notes), these songs are delivered with Swift’s trademark gusto and megawatt professionalism - and it’s a five-star album.'

The Mirror - Mollie Quirk 

'Overall, The Tortured Poets Department is the most magnificent body of work that sees Taylor combine her love of poetry and music. 

'The album is incredibly deep and moving, hard to unravel and decode, yet easy to fall into and draw comparisons to of your own life.'

BBC - Mark Savage

'The Tortured Poets Department is an uneven album, and one that lacks a slam-dunk radio anthem like Anti-Hero or Shake It Off - but Swift has pop music in a stranglehold for now, so it will sell by the bucketload, even though it leaked a day ahead of release.'

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'Its 16 songs stretch out across 66 tireless minutes, with bonus tracks take the running time to over 74 minutes. 

'It's essentially a double album. It's also an immersive, cinematic affair that often feels more like an old Hollywood film script than a straightforward pop record.'

Many fans had predicted that The Tortured Poets Department album would be the ultimate Joe/Taylor 'break-up album' as it's been speculated the name was a direct dig at the British actor, who she dated from 2016 to early 2023. 

Taylor - who recently teased a 'timetable' to her fans ahead of the LP's release - initially announced the album while attending the 2024 Grammys in February.

READ MORE: Taylor Swift's The Tortured Poets Department full tracklist and meanings: How singer's lyrics reflect on her ill-fated romances and reignite bitter feud in most personal album yet

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THE TORTURED POETS DEPARTMENT: TRACK-BY-TRACK 

Fortnight 

A tuneful duet with Post Malone and a song seemingly about a two-week fling. The slow, electronic rhythms set the early tone.

The Tortured Poets Department

Another shimmering melody, and lyrics which suggest that Taylor, modestly, doesn't see herself at the top table of tortured poets: 'You're not Dylan Thomas, and I'm not Patti Smith.'

My Boy Only Breaks His Favorite Toys

Written solely by Swift, this song's dense electronic hum adds forceful notes. 'Once I fix me, he's gonna miss me,' she vows.

Down Bad

'Everything comes out teenage petulance,' sings Taylor as she bitterly surveys the fallout from an old relationship.

So Long, London

The first track to be written with The National's Aaron Dessner brings a change of pace, with a lovely, choral intro. 'So long, London, you'll find someone,' sings Taylor.

This is her first new album since the end of her six-year relationship with British actor Joe Alwyn and, while she doesn't mention Alwyn by name, speculation will be rife that tracks such as So Long, London are about him. Pictured together in 2019

This is her first new album since the end of her six-year relationship with British actor Joe Alwyn and, while she doesn't mention Alwyn by name, speculation will be rife that tracks such as So Long, London are about him. Pictured together in 2019

But Daddy I Love Him

'I know he's crazy, but he's the one I want,' sings Swift, showing wry humour as she admits to falling for the bad boys. Produced, with real brightness, by Dessner.

Fresh Out The Slammer

Finger-picked acoustic guitar adds folky notes reminiscent of lockdown albums Folklore and Evermore.

Florida!!!

An album highlight, this theatrical duet with London singer Florence Welch is an uplifting song of escape – from small-town life and a bad romance.

Guilty As Sin?

A tale of unrequited love, and a superb slice of 1980s-style soft rock. It even mentions The Downtown Lights, a 1989 single by Scottish band The Blue Nile.

Who's Afraid Of Little Old Me?

Big drums, a dramatic arrangement, and more dry humour in another song penned solely by Swift. 'You wouldn't last an hour in the asylum where they raised me,' she snarls.

I Can Fix Him (No Really I Can)

A moody, stripped-down number worthy of Lana Del Rey, who has also worked extensively with the song's producer, Jack Antonoff.

The Alchemy: Sporting metaphors aplenty suggest a track inspired by the singer's current boyfriend, American football star Travis Kelce. Pictured at Coachella this week

The Alchemy: Sporting metaphors aplenty suggest a track inspired by the singer's current boyfriend, American football star Travis Kelce. Pictured at Coachella this week

Loml

'You said I'm the love of your life,' sings Taylor on this warm, resonant piano ballad. In a smart twist, the 'loml' ultimately becomes 'the loss of my life'.

I Can Do It With A Broken Heart

More 1980s influences on an electronic pop track that sees Taylor vowing to remain a trouper, despite any romantic strife.

The Smallest Man Who Ever Lived

'You didn't measure up in any measure of a man,' sings a disdainful Swift on a melodramatic ballad.

The Alchemy

Sporting metaphors aplenty suggest a track inspired by the singer's current boyfriend, American football star Travis Kelce. 'When I touch down, call the amateurs and cut them from the team,' she sings.

Clara Bow

It's tempting to think Taylor sees something of herself in a closing track inspired by an American actress of the 1920s who lived her life in the Hollywood goldfish bowl.