Tue. May 21st, 2024
taylor-alert-–-celine-dion-reveals-the-reason-she-never-borrows-clothes-from-top-designers-like-other-celebsTaylor Alert – Celine Dion reveals the reason she NEVER borrows clothes from top designers like other celebs

Celine Dion has revealed she never borrows clothes from fashion designers, which is often the practice amongst her fellow celebrities.

The iconic songstress, 55, who before her recent health battles, was a regular face on the front row of the world’s biggest runway shows, said she always buys every time she wishes to wear ‘as a mark of respect’.

Celine, who said she grew up with hand-me-downs thanks to her 13 older siblings told Vogue France: ‘I have always bought everything myself. I didn’t want to borrow. It’s a form of respect’. 

Before adding: ‘People pay to come and hear me sing, so I pay to buy myself clothes by designers’.

She also recalling her first designer purchase after hitting the big time with her first English album Unison in 1990 and being invited to a show in Paris.

Celine Dion, 55, has revealed she never borrows clothes from fashion designers, which is often the practice amongst her fellow celebrities (pictured 2019)

Celine Dion, 55, has revealed she never borrows clothes from fashion designers, which is often the practice amongst her fellow celebrities (pictured 2019)

The iconic songstress who before her recent health battles, was a regular face on the front row of the world's biggest runway shows, said she always buys every time she wishes to wear 'as a mark of respect' (pictured in February)

The iconic songstress who before her recent health battles, was a regular face on the front row of the world’s biggest runway shows, said she always buys every time she wishes to wear ‘as a mark of respect’ (pictured in February) 

She told the publication:  ‘I’ll never forget this show by Karl Lagerfeld, he looked at me and said, “You remind me of [Maria] Callas.” I treated myself to a Lagerfeld jacket in the same way that people buy themselves diamonds’. 

Celine looked looked sensational as she wowed in a racy shoot for the magazine while posing topless in an oversized white shirt and shorts. 

The singer, who revealed she had been diagnosed with the rare neurological disease in an emotional video back in 2022, shared how she deals with the syndrome day to day as she confessed she ‘takes it one day at a time’ and is ‘learning to live with it’. 

Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a degenerative condition that causes muscles to tense and spasm uncontrollably. Ultimately, it leaves sufferers resembling ‘human statues as it progressively locks the body, leaving people unable to walk or talk. 

Currently, there is no cure for SPS, but there are steps that can be taken to slow down symptoms – something Celine revealed she is exploring.

The star last made a surprise appearance onstage at the Grammy Awards in February, as she presented Taylor Swift with her Album of the Year Award, following several years out the spotlight. 

It was the first time she had been seen out in public for months, and now Celine has also revealed whether she will ever take to the stage to perform again. 

The Montreal-born singer announced in 2022 she was suffering from the degenerative disorder, which is called Moersch-Woltman Syndrome by medical professionals, after speculation about her health mounted following concert postponements. 

Celine, who said she grew up with hand-me-downs thanks to her 13 older siblings said: 'I have always bought everything myself. I didn¿t want to borrow. It¿s a form of respect'.

Celine, who said she grew up with hand-me-downs thanks to her 13 older siblings said: ‘I have always bought everything myself. I didn’t want to borrow. It’s a form of respect’.

Celine (L) in at Schiaparelli Haute Couture show in 2019 with French actress Isabelle Huppert (R)

Celine (L) in at Schiaparelli Haute Couture show in 2019 with French actress Isabelle Huppert (R)

In the video, posted on Instagram in December 2022, she said: ‘While we’re still learning about this rare condition, we now know this is what’s been causing all the [muscle] spasms I’ve been having.’

As she explained her diagnosis to her followers, Celine said: ‘Unfortunately, these spasms affect every aspect of my daily life, sometimes causing difficulties when I walk and not allowing me to use my vocal cords to sing the way I’m used to.’

With a career lasting almost forty years, the star also spoke to Vogue about fame and he determination to never give up. 

‘Celebrity has made me want to never give up on anything. I was born to communicate on stage, with my team, and with my voice, and with my fans. It’s about sharing. I was born to do that.’

Celine concluded: ‘My dream is to live in the present. Today, I am a woman, who feels strong and positive about the future. One day at a time.’

The singer was forced to cancel her European tour in February 2023 due to her symptoms.

She told fans: ‘I have a great team of doctors working alongside me to help me get better and my precious children who are supporting me and giving me help.’

The Montreal-born singer revealed in an emotional video message posted on Instagram in 2022 that she has been diagnosed with a degenerative neurological condition known as 'stiff person syndrome'

The Montreal-born singer revealed in an emotional video message posted on Instagram in 2022 that she has been diagnosed with a degenerative neurological condition known as ‘stiff person syndrome’

The singer's diagnosis was yet more heartbreak after her husband of 22 years Rene Angelil (pictured) died of throat cancer in 2016

The singer’s diagnosis was yet more heartbreak after her husband of 22 years Rene Angelil (pictured) died of throat cancer in 2016

In November 2023, Celine made her first public appearance for nearly three years as she attended an ice hockey game with her three sons Rene-Charles, 23, and twins Eddy and Nelson, 13

In November 2023, Celine made her first public appearance for nearly three years as she attended an ice hockey game with her three sons Rene-Charles, 23, and twins Eddy and Nelson, 13

‘I’m working hard with my sports medicine therapist every day to build back my strength and my ability to perform again but I have to admit it’s been a struggle.

‘All I know is singing; it’s what I’ve done all my life and its what I love to do the most.

‘I miss you so much. I miss seeing all of you being on the stage performing for you.

‘I always give 100 percent when I do my show but my condition is now allowing me to give you that right now.

‘For me to reach you again, I have no choice but to concentrate on my health at this moment, and I have hope that I’m on the road to recovery.’

‘This is my focus, and I’m doing everything I can to recuperate.

‘I want to thank you so much for your wishes and love and support on my social media. This means a lot to me.

‘Take care of yourselves. Be well. I love you guys so much and I really hope I can see you again real soon.’

WHAT IS STIFF PERSON SYNDROME? 

Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder. Symptoms may include: Stiff muscles in the trunk (torso), arms, and legs. Greater sensitivity to noise, touch, and emotional distress, which can set off muscle spasms, according to NIH.

Over time people with SPS may develop hunched over postures. Some people may be too disabled to walk or move. Many fall frequently because they do not have the normal reflexes to catch themselves. This can lead to serious injuries. People with SPS may be afraid to leave the house because street noises, such as the sound of a car horn, can trigger spasms and falls.

Who is more likely to get stiff-person syndrome?

SPS affects twice as many females as males.

It is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases such as type-I diabetes, thyroiditis, vitiligo, and pernicious anemia.

Scientists don’t yet understand what causes SPS, but research indicates that it is the result of an autoimmune response gone awry in the brain and spinal cord.

How is stiff-person syndrome diagnosed and treated?

Diagnosing SPS

SPS is often misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, psychosomatic illness, or anxiety and phobia. A definitive diagnosis can be made with a blood test that measures the level of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies.

Most people with SPS have elevated (higher) levels of GAD antibodies. Antibody titers are important for the diagnosis of SPS. A titer is a laboratory test that measures the presence and amount of antibodies in blood. Elevated GAD titers, up to 10 times above normal, also are seen in diabetes but in SPS the titers are very high (at least 10 times above the range seen in diabetes) or are present in the spinal fluid.

Treating SPS

With appropriate treatment, SPS symptoms may be kept under control. Several symptoms improve with oral diazepam (an anti-anxiety and muscle relaxant drug) or with drugs that alleviate muscle spasms, such as baclofen or gabapentin.

A study funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) showed that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment is effective in reducing stiffness, sensitivity to noise, touch, and stress and for improving gait and balance for people with SPS. IVIg contains immunoglobulins (natural antibodies produced by the immune system) derived from thousands of healthy donors.

INFORMATION COURTEST NIH